The Arctic Resilience Report, launched last Friday, 25 November, identifies 19 tipping points that can and have occurred in Arctic marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystems.

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The Arctic Resilience Report, released last Friday, 25 November, has captured worldwide attention. The report identifies 19 tipping points that can and have occurred in Arctic marine, freshwater, and terrestrial ecosystems. These regime shifts affect the stability of the climate and landscape, plant and animal species’ ability to survive, and indigenous peoples’ subsistence and ways of life.

“This ground-breaking report, based on direct evidence from case studies across the circumpolar Arctic, is an unprecedented effort to gain insight from what is happening on the ground in the region’s social-ecological systems,” said Joel Clement, one of the project’s co-chairs.

Click here to explore the digital introduction to the Arctic Resilience Report.

Click here to access the full report.

Produced by an international team of researchers under the auspices of the Arctic Council, it is the first comprehensive assessment of ecosystems and societies in the region. It is the concluding product of the Arctic Resilience Assessment, a project launched during the Swedish Chairmanship of the Arctic Council.

Resources and references (Click any link below)

Stockholm Environment Institute
Arctic Council backgrounder

United States Chairmanship information
Images for media use
The Arctic Council on Facebook
The Arctic Council on Twitter
The Arctic Council Working Groups: ACAP, AMAP, CAFF, EPPR, PAME and SDWG.