Lars-Otto Reiersen, Executive Secretary of the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme (AMAP) recently received the prestigious SETAC Rachel Carson Award.

"The work of Lars-Otto Reiersen and AMAP on how human activities affect the fragile ecosystems in the Arctic is extremely important, especially for us politicians. AMAP provided the basis for decisions on several international conventions and agreements in which the main point is to get control of emissions of pollutants that eventually end up in the Arctic ecosystems", says Norwegian Environment Minister, Bård Vegar Solhjell.

The Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) is a non-profit global organization engaged in studies and analyzes of environmental problems and solutions. The organization is concerned with the management and distribution of natural resources, environmental education as well as research and development. The SETAC Rachel Carson Award is named after the American scientist Rachel Carson. It was initiated on the 25th anniversary of the publication of her book "Silent Spring" (1962). Rachel Carson was a meticulous researcher who, through her literary skills, made science understandable to the general public.

Reiersen is an outstanding environmental science leader who has served for twenty years as Executive Secretary of AMAP, a Working Group founded under the auspices of the Arctic Environmental Protection Strategy (AEPS), the international institution preceding the Arctic Council. Reiersen has contributed significantly to the founding and development of the Arctic Council through his commitment to the protection of the Arctic environment.

“I am deeply honored to receive the Rachel Carson Award, and I see this award as a recognition of the work that hundreds of scientists and experts have carried out over the decades in the Arctic – and I share the Award with all of them. It is an inspiration to continue the work.” says Lars-Otto Reiersen.

Lars-Otto Reiersen is the first European to receive the SETAC Rachel Carson Award. The prize has earlier been awarded to researchers from the USA, Canada and Australia.

Read the press release from the Norwegian Ministry of Environment.

Photo: Inger Utne, AMAP