As the Arctic continues to experience a period of intense and accelerating change it has become increasingly important to have better information on the status and trends of the Arctic environment.

Historically, monitoring practices in the Arctic have been largely fragmented and incomplete.

To address this shortcoming, the Arctic Council has increased long-term monitoring efforts and inventories to address key gaps in Arctic knowledge. These continuous efforts allow Arctic states to better facilitate the development and implementation of conservation and management strategies.

The 2004 Arctic Climate Impact Assessment (ACIA) recommended that long term Arctic biodiversity monitoring be expanded and enhanced.

In response, two of the Council's working groups — the Conservation of Arctic Flora and Fauna (CAFF) and Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Program (AMAP) examined the report's findings and developed follow-up programs that address key projections for the future of the Arctic.

Arctic monitoring news

5 things to know about Arctic seabirds and plastics

Seabirds play an important role in marine ecosystems and are culturally important for Arctic Indigenous Peoples. However, some Arctic seabird species are in decline due t...
10 Dec 2023

Norwegian Chairship Launches Initiative to Address Wildland Fires in the Arctic

The Chairship Wildland Fires Initiative aims to increase circumpolar collaboration, knowledge sharing and partnership on wildland fires to tackle this urgent climate issu...
19 Oct 2023

Snapshot of an ever-changing Arctic: The state of Arctic terrestrial biodiversity

Climate change is driving significant changes that could lead to ecological catastrophes in the Arctic
10 May 2021
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